What is the basic mechanism behind Air conditioner.

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How does an air conditioner cool down a room?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

In very simple terms, you have some medium that is in liquid form but gasous at room temperature.
In thermodynamics, when a medium changes it’s phase from liquid to gas, it needs energy to do that. This energy comes from the heat of the room. So by changing to a gas it removes thermal energy from it’s surroundings.

A pump then moves the gas to the unti outside. There the reverse is happening. A compressor puts pressure on the gas and turns it to a liquid agsin. This releases heat, which is then blown out through the big fans on the unit.
The pump transports the liquid back inside where it all starts over again.

Anonymous 0 Comments

In very simple terms, you have some medium that is in liquid form but gasous at room temperature.
In thermodynamics, when a medium changes it’s phase from liquid to gas, it needs energy to do that. This energy comes from the heat of the room. So by changing to a gas it removes thermal energy from it’s surroundings.

A pump then moves the gas to the unti outside. There the reverse is happening. A compressor puts pressure on the gas and turns it to a liquid agsin. This releases heat, which is then blown out through the big fans on the unit.
The pump transports the liquid back inside where it all starts over again.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Fan makes air go woosh woosh wesh wesh woosh a special cooler inside makes the air cold as it passes through and bam you are sleeping like a baby in a curdle

Anonymous 0 Comments

Fan makes air go woosh woosh wesh wesh woosh a special cooler inside makes the air cold as it passes through and bam you are sleeping like a baby in a curdle

Anonymous 0 Comments

Have you ever used a bicycle pump or a spray can?

Did you notice that the tip of the pump heats up during use, and that the can feels colder after use?

This is two reverse sides of the same physical phenomenon:

* Compressing a gas creates heat.
* Decompressing a gas sucks heat in.

When you touch the can, your fingertips “feel” cold because heat is being sucked out of them by the surface of the can.

So you can use that principle to cool down air.

We put a specific type of gas under pressure in a spot where it doesn’t matter if heats is released, then we release the gas through an S shaped closed pipe system, where it will suck heat in while cooling out the air that touches the pipe.

This is why there are always two sides to cooling systems:

* The back of your refrigerator lets warm air flow away, while the inside cools the air down.
* The part of your air conditioning that sticks outside releases warm air, while the part inside cools it down.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Have you ever used a bicycle pump or a spray can?

Did you notice that the tip of the pump heats up during use, and that the can feels colder after use?

This is two reverse sides of the same physical phenomenon:

* Compressing a gas creates heat.
* Decompressing a gas sucks heat in.

When you touch the can, your fingertips “feel” cold because heat is being sucked out of them by the surface of the can.

So you can use that principle to cool down air.

We put a specific type of gas under pressure in a spot where it doesn’t matter if heats is released, then we release the gas through an S shaped closed pipe system, where it will suck heat in while cooling out the air that touches the pipe.

This is why there are always two sides to cooling systems:

* The back of your refrigerator lets warm air flow away, while the inside cools the air down.
* The part of your air conditioning that sticks outside releases warm air, while the part inside cools it down.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you let a liquid evaporate, it gets cold because turning into a gas absorbs heat.

If you squish a gas until it turns liquid, it gets hot because turning back into a liquid releases all the heat it absorbed to turn into a gas.

An AC lets a liquid evaporate inside, making inside cold, and then squishes the gas back into a liquid outside, dumping the heat from inside into the outside. It’s the circle of life.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you let a liquid evaporate, it gets cold because turning into a gas absorbs heat.

If you squish a gas until it turns liquid, it gets hot because turning back into a liquid releases all the heat it absorbed to turn into a gas.

An AC lets a liquid evaporate inside, making inside cold, and then squishes the gas back into a liquid outside, dumping the heat from inside into the outside. It’s the circle of life.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Imagine you have a container of bouncy balls that get hot when they’re close to each-other, and get colder when they’re separated. Basically simplified gas molecules.

If you want to cool your room down, do these steps.

1: Take your container of bouncy balls outside and squeeze them all together so the whole container gets hot. Now blow on the container until it cools right down to ambient temperature, this removes the heat energy from the box into the outside air.

2: Walk back into your room with your now squeezed box of balls and release the pressure on the container. All the balls spread out and now the box gets really cold. Blow on the box until it warms up to room temperature. Now your room is a little bit colder than it was.

3: Repeat

The clever part is that this order can be reversed depending on weather you want to heat or cool your room. The location (inside/outside) where you squeeze the bouncy balls will get warmer, and where you release the squeeze will cool down. So the box outside your house and the box on your internal wall will swap who does the squeezing and who does the releasing depending on what temperature you want.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Imagine you have a container of bouncy balls that get hot when they’re close to each-other, and get colder when they’re separated. Basically simplified gas molecules.

If you want to cool your room down, do these steps.

1: Take your container of bouncy balls outside and squeeze them all together so the whole container gets hot. Now blow on the container until it cools right down to ambient temperature, this removes the heat energy from the box into the outside air.

2: Walk back into your room with your now squeezed box of balls and release the pressure on the container. All the balls spread out and now the box gets really cold. Blow on the box until it warms up to room temperature. Now your room is a little bit colder than it was.

3: Repeat

The clever part is that this order can be reversed depending on weather you want to heat or cool your room. The location (inside/outside) where you squeeze the bouncy balls will get warmer, and where you release the squeeze will cool down. So the box outside your house and the box on your internal wall will swap who does the squeezing and who does the releasing depending on what temperature you want.