What is the theoretical limit that a fan blowing air out of an enclosed space can drop the air pressure inside the space to? (Can use layman’s terms)

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What is the theoretical limit that a fan blowing air out of an enclosed space can drop the air pressure inside the space to? (Can use layman’s terms)

In: Physics

When the vacuum in the enclosed space is “stronger” than the fan power. (Or, the low pressure created overwhelms the blower).

Define fan, turbo pumps can take an enclosed space down to about 10^-13 of an atmosphere.

Too many unknowns. Main issue is the fan design (blade type, blower versus fan versus pump, cfm relative differential pressure, etc). Is the room sealed?

In theory, the pressure could be dropped to zero.

In reality, the question is un-answerable without a lot more variables defined.

You’re going to run into engineering limits long before you run into theoretical ones. A fan’s spin is limited by the strength of the material making up its blades, and the very strongest materials available (if they’re at a roughly human-sized scale) cap out at around 100,000 rpm. Which turns out to be a good thing, because [those centrifuges are one of the major bottlenecks for enriching weapons-grade uranium](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zippe-type_centrifuge).