What’s the difference between breathing in through your nose and mouth? And why it’s recommended to do it through the nose?

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What’s the difference between breathing in through your nose and mouth? And why it’s recommended to do it through the nose?

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Your nose airways have special structures that heat up and moisturize the incoming air before it hits the lungs. The walls of the airways are also covered in mucus to which bacteria, dust etc. tend to stick, and they also have specialized cells with structures that make kinda sweeping motions to get those stuck bacteria and dust particles back out the way they came. So when breathing through your nose your lungs are overall better protected from the dangers of the outside air.

The nose has sticky hairs that filter out particles like dust, pollen, and some germs. And your nose warms and moistens the air

Edited typo

Your nose is basically an air purifier.

You have lots of little hairs that help absorb particles and block other things. Also, in the process of breathing your nose and traveling through your meat tubage, the air gets warmed up and humidified. This is easier for your lungs to process than straight colder/ dry air is.

Bonus fun fact for CPAP users (breathing machines for sleep apnea) they have water humidifiers for this very reason. Without it the dry air being forced into your nose can cause all sorts of irritation, it needs the warmer air to be more accessible and useable to your body (still not always a perfect system though).

The nose is designed to warm and moisten the air, and also limit bacteria and particles from getting down into the lungs. This is good, and keeps your lungs in peak health.

You can take air in faster through the mouth, but at the expense of directly pulling in more junk, and colder drier air (which can cause inflammation or reduce the lung’s ability to get oxygen from the air).

It’s not uncommon for martial artists and certain athletes to be taught to breath in through their nose and out through their mouth.

Answers pretty much have covered it, but I’ll add that mouth breathing during your developmental years can even result to bad craniofacial-dental growth.

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7944632/](https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7944632/)

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295456/](https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295456/)