Whats the difference between ethylene glycol & dexcool antifreeze/coolant?

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Whats the difference between ethylene glycol & dexcool antifreeze/coolant?

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Dexcool eliminated silicates and phosphates. This was better for the types of seals that GM prefers to use in cars. It’s not just like the other stuff is 100% ethylene glycol molecules.

Automotive coolants are a blend of chemicals. The main components are water (for heat transfer), an alcohol (typically ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, glycerol or a mixture) to reduce freezing point and increase boiling point, and a blend of anti-corrosion chemicals.

A variety of anti-corrosion chemicals have been used in automotive coolants over the years. They all have slightly different properties and different compatabilities.

Traditional formulas intended for engines made from iron, were based on inorganic chemicals (usually silicates but sometimes phosphates). These worked very effectively, but were not very stable and would degrade and form sludge after a few years, so the coolant would need regular draining, flushing and replacing with fresh coolant. This was expensive and created a lot of chemical waste (especially as some of the minor ingredients in the anti-corrosion blend became highly toxic during use) .

Silicates were also less suitable for aluminum engines. So, for these reasons manufacturers looked to change to something different for their modern engines.

The main change was to replace inorganic formulas with organic acids. These were chemicals like ethyl-hexanoic acid, sebacic acid and other weirdly named obscure chemicals. These were better for aluminum and because they didn’t degrade like silicates did, only needed changing after 10 years.

Dexcool is a brand name used by GM to refer to their coolants which use organic acid technology.

Other manufacturers also switched organic acids.

Most recently, most manufacturers have now switched to mixed formulations using organic acids and small quantities of inorganic chemicals: stabilised silicates (most Euro manufacturers) or phosphates (Japanese manufacturers). They claim that the combination approach lasts longer and is more effective at preventing corrosion.

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Whats the difference between ethylene glycol & dexcool antifreeze/coolant?

In: 1

Dexcool eliminated silicates and phosphates. This was better for the types of seals that GM prefers to use in cars. It’s not just like the other stuff is 100% ethylene glycol molecules.

Automotive coolants are a blend of chemicals. The main components are water (for heat transfer), an alcohol (typically ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, glycerol or a mixture) to reduce freezing point and increase boiling point, and a blend of anti-corrosion chemicals.

A variety of anti-corrosion chemicals have been used in automotive coolants over the years. They all have slightly different properties and different compatabilities.

Traditional formulas intended for engines made from iron, were based on inorganic chemicals (usually silicates but sometimes phosphates). These worked very effectively, but were not very stable and would degrade and form sludge after a few years, so the coolant would need regular draining, flushing and replacing with fresh coolant. This was expensive and created a lot of chemical waste (especially as some of the minor ingredients in the anti-corrosion blend became highly toxic during use) .

Silicates were also less suitable for aluminum engines. So, for these reasons manufacturers looked to change to something different for their modern engines.

The main change was to replace inorganic formulas with organic acids. These were chemicals like ethyl-hexanoic acid, sebacic acid and other weirdly named obscure chemicals. These were better for aluminum and because they didn’t degrade like silicates did, only needed changing after 10 years.

Dexcool is a brand name used by GM to refer to their coolants which use organic acid technology.

Other manufacturers also switched organic acids.

Most recently, most manufacturers have now switched to mixed formulations using organic acids and small quantities of inorganic chemicals: stabilised silicates (most Euro manufacturers) or phosphates (Japanese manufacturers). They claim that the combination approach lasts longer and is more effective at preventing corrosion.