why are fights designed by weight instead of height and brutal force?

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Pretty much the question

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8 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

A 6’6″ fighter with the physique of an NBA player could be put up against a 6’4″ *monster* who would annihilate him if it were by height. And what do you mean by brutal force, like muscle mass? That’s not all that different from weight for organized bouts since the fighters are all in quite good shape. Weight matters a lot in a fight.

Anonymous 0 Comments

A 6’6″ fighter with the physique of an NBA player could be put up against a 6’4″ *monster* who would annihilate him if it were by height. And what do you mean by brutal force, like muscle mass? That’s not all that different from weight for organized bouts since the fighters are all in quite good shape. Weight matters a lot in a fight.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because height is just a tool and brutal force is part of what’s being measured.

If you’re taller and stronger, you’ll weigh more, or have less of something else like bone density or water content. Weight classes do a pretty good job of canceling out advantages other than technique; for every advantage you gain with height/muscle, you lose reflex/dexterity/endurance if the weight stays the same.

At junior levels, any quick thinker can use their physique to advantage in the ring; at pro levels it tends to settle on stockier and muscular— but not always. You can predict a lot about someone’s technique by their build, and if you have a chance to study them, then it all comes down to who has the winning combination of physique and strategy.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because height is just a tool and brutal force is part of what’s being measured.

If you’re taller and stronger, you’ll weigh more, or have less of something else like bone density or water content. Weight classes do a pretty good job of canceling out advantages other than technique; for every advantage you gain with height/muscle, you lose reflex/dexterity/endurance if the weight stays the same.

At junior levels, any quick thinker can use their physique to advantage in the ring; at pro levels it tends to settle on stockier and muscular— but not always. You can predict a lot about someone’s technique by their build, and if you have a chance to study them, then it all comes down to who has the winning combination of physique and strategy.

Anonymous 0 Comments

All else equal, weight is one of the most important factor in hand to hand combat. Of course if someone is “overweight” then that advantage isn’t as important (but still present).

Length (and height) is important for reach and leverage, but a shorter individual with more mass (usually muscle) will often offset those advantages.

Anonymous 0 Comments

All else equal, weight is one of the most important factor in hand to hand combat. Of course if someone is “overweight” then that advantage isn’t as important (but still present).

Length (and height) is important for reach and leverage, but a shorter individual with more mass (usually muscle) will often offset those advantages.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Measuring force would be extremely difficult to do accurately, especially if the fighter has an incentive to downplay how strong they are.

Height isn’t a big deal. You can be 6ft and skinny, with no muscle, or 5ft and a pro bodybuilder.

Weight is the “best” way to categorise for fights or strength competitions. It’s still not perfect, but is probably the best we have.

It’s also worth noting that athletes have some control over their weight. They can choose to go up or down a weight class, which requires a lot of training and effort. They can’t choose to change their height.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Measuring force would be extremely difficult to do accurately, especially if the fighter has an incentive to downplay how strong they are.

Height isn’t a big deal. You can be 6ft and skinny, with no muscle, or 5ft and a pro bodybuilder.

Weight is the “best” way to categorise for fights or strength competitions. It’s still not perfect, but is probably the best we have.

It’s also worth noting that athletes have some control over their weight. They can choose to go up or down a weight class, which requires a lot of training and effort. They can’t choose to change their height.