why are there different sized batteries (aaa-D, etc) if they all put out the same 1.5v?

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why are there different sized batteries (aaa-D, etc) if they all put out the same 1.5v?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

The size of the battery changes the capacity (how much total power is stored) rather than voltage. A large D-cell battery will run longer than a AA-cell for the same power draw.

The voltage is dictated by the chemistry inside of the battery. Basically, different elements or molecules have different electro-chemical potentials. That’s why alkaline, lead-acid, NiMH, Li-Ion, LiFePO4, etc all have different voltages: they all have different chemistries.

You have different ***size*** batteries for different uses that may have other design choices. For instance, you don’t want to use giant D-cell batteries for your Tv remote control because that would be uncomfortable in the hand and remotes use very little power. However, if you have something larger that has heavy power draw, maybe those D-cell batteries make more sense.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The ELI5 version of this is that bigger batteries will be able to supply the same voltage for a much longer time (higher capacity) or with more intensity (higher amperage, or current)

Anonymous 0 Comments

The size of the battery changes the capacity (how much total power is stored) rather than voltage. A large D-cell battery will run longer than a AA-cell for the same power draw.

The voltage is dictated by the chemistry inside of the battery. Basically, different elements or molecules have different electro-chemical potentials. That’s why alkaline, lead-acid, NiMH, Li-Ion, LiFePO4, etc all have different voltages: they all have different chemistries.

You have different ***size*** batteries for different uses that may have other design choices. For instance, you don’t want to use giant D-cell batteries for your Tv remote control because that would be uncomfortable in the hand and remotes use very little power. However, if you have something larger that has heavy power draw, maybe those D-cell batteries make more sense.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The ELI5 version of this is that bigger batteries will be able to supply the same voltage for a much longer time (higher capacity) or with more intensity (higher amperage, or current)

Anonymous 0 Comments

The electrical charge capacity is larger with a larger battery.

For alkaline batteries, it is around

* AAA 1,200mAh
* AA 2,400mAh
* C 8,000mAh
* D 12,000 mAh

If you power a device that draws 1.2 amp then a AAA would last 1 hour, a AA 2 hours, C 5.6 hours, and D 10 hours.

The main drawback of large batteries is that they are physical, larger, and heavier. Batteries also age and can leak so it is not necessarily a good idea that put in a battery in a device that would last 10 years if it did not fail.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The electrical charge capacity is larger with a larger battery.

For alkaline batteries, it is around

* AAA 1,200mAh
* AA 2,400mAh
* C 8,000mAh
* D 12,000 mAh

If you power a device that draws 1.2 amp then a AAA would last 1 hour, a AA 2 hours, C 5.6 hours, and D 10 hours.

The main drawback of large batteries is that they are physical, larger, and heavier. Batteries also age and can leak so it is not necessarily a good idea that put in a battery in a device that would last 10 years if it did not fail.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The real answer is just there was no king of all batteries that got to make a super sane system right off and a few different types got into wide use before someone said “man, we should figure out standards for this”.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The real answer is just there was no king of all batteries that got to make a super sane system right off and a few different types got into wide use before someone said “man, we should figure out standards for this”.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I’ll treat you like you’re five. Batteries are food for electronics. The hungrier your device the more it wants to eat or drink. The hungrier the device the bigger battery or food it needs.

Voltage is like drinking a soda through a straw. No matter how big your cup is you can only drink it so fast.

Amps are how many straws you use at one. More straws means you can drink much more at once.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I’ll treat you like you’re five. Batteries are food for electronics. The hungrier your device the more it wants to eat or drink. The hungrier the device the bigger battery or food it needs.

Voltage is like drinking a soda through a straw. No matter how big your cup is you can only drink it so fast.

Amps are how many straws you use at one. More straws means you can drink much more at once.