Why can you see through cloth when it’s right up to your face, but much less so when it’s farther away ?

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Why can you see through cloth when it’s right up to your face, but much less so when it’s farther away ?

In: Physics

Fibers go vertically and horizontally and up and down interlocking each other and forming little squares. In some fabrics the squares are bigger then others. If you put a piece of fabric/cloth against your face you are seeing through this squares, but bc they are small, when it goes farther away, you stop being able to see through the squares bc you are seeing a bigger part of it.

This is true with anything with lots of holes, like woven materials or screens. When they are close to your eye the holes appear bigger therefor easier to see through. Make a tiny hole with your fingertips then try to look through it at arms length then right up to your face. Then imagine that times the thousands of threads that make up cloth.

You can see because of light entering your eye. Light moves like a stream. The cloth blocks some of the light but not all of it. From far away, the light coming through is dispersed to much for you too see what is on the other side of the cloth. As you move closer, you get more concentrated streams of light from the other side making in into your eye. Once they are strong enough, you can get a picture of what’s on the other side.