Why can’t braille just be raised text of letters that already exist?

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For example, how the name of a building or room might be written in English but with letters that are raised instead of flat on the walls they’re written on. Wouldn’t it be easier for braille to just be raised lettering of letter shapes that are already used? That way someone who maybe lost their vision later in life wouldn’t have to re-learn the alphabet they read with; they could just feel out the raised text and be like “oh I recognize this shape as the letter [insert]”?

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2 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

> Wouldn’t it be easier for braille to just be raised lettering of letter shapes that are already used?

No, because regular letters are hard to tell apart by touch. They need to be small enough that a single finger can cover them completely, yet also be capable of being distinguished. For example “e”, “a”, and “s” would be pretty hard to tell apart.

Braille is much easier to distinguish with such restrictions and also has the benefit of being more easily reproduced on various materials. Paper can easily be embossed with small separate bumps but the various swoops and enclosed areas of normal letters are more difficult.

Anonymous 0 Comments

>Wouldn’t it be easier for braille to just be raised lettering of letter shapes that are already used? 

When Braille was invented, such a thing existed. The Braille alphabet became more popular because it was easier to read.