why do gums bleed when flossing

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why do gums bleed when flossing

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Bleeding indicates that your gums are in poor health. It could be a sign of gum disease. Healthy gums do not bleed when you floss.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Floss more often, at least once a day. If you don’t floss regularly, your gums will bleed as they are not used to this kind of thing. Once you floss for a few days, your gums will build up a tolerance to it and will no longer bleed.

If you notice any especially stinky smells when you floss the first time, this is the smell of tooth decay
Once you floss a few times and keep with it, you will never smell this stinkiness again (and you will have far less tooth decay).

Anonymous 0 Comments

The gums around your teeth have a job. Their job is to hug the tooth really tight to help keep tooth bugs out. When you don’t brush real good the tooth bugs sit on the tooth right above the gum and just poop acid on them till they get mad and red and puffy. That’s why it’s important to brush and floss all the bugs off. If they sit there too long without being flossed or brushed off, your spit turns those tooth bugs into stone called tarter and the tarter starts growing on your tooth like barnacles On a dock and imagine trying to hug barnacles! You’d bleed too.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because you don’t floss often enough or properly. Most people struggle with both. Optimal flossing would be morning and night with string floss (stay away from floss picks) or other implements if you can’t use string for some reason (dexterity, deep recession). The floss shouldn’t go straight up and down but should match the shape of the teeth with a back-and-forth motion as they go snugly into the gum. This will bring your gum infection to a manageable level that allows your gums to be more robust and healthy and the bleeding will stop completely.

Assuming you brush often enough and properly.

Anonymous 0 Comments

BECAUSE YOU DON’T FLOSS ENOUGH! The real reason could be due to improper flossing technique. If you are “popping” the floss in and out of the space between your teeth you may be doing damage by going too deep or using too much pressure. The correct technique according to my dentist is to slowly press and work the floss in there and scrape the sides of the teeth with it. This dislodges buildup and can disrupt microbial colonies.

Edit: the first line is a joke

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because you don’t floss enough.

Mine bled when I first started too. Once you keep those spaces clean for long enough the gums get more resilient. Scum makes them weak.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Gums that bleed when flossed are weak. When flossed frequently enough (for the purpose of cleaning the teeth), the gums become strong. At that point they’ll no longer bleed when flossed.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Well, if your teeth fit anywhere near as tightly as mine, it’s because it’s physically impossible to insert floss between them without sufficient force to deeply cut your gums. This means you SHOULD NOT FLOSS. Yes whatever it’s usually good but if your teeth fit like that all you’re going to do is literally give yourself constant gum pain with healing wounds. Half the time the floss cuts itself before even getting into the gap and bleeding me. Fuck floss. Never again for me.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because you aren’t flossing regularly. Floss at least once a day and your gums will become healthier and stop bleeding when you floss. If they continue to bleed, see a dentist.