Why do violent sneezes cause you to feel pain in seemingly unrelated body parts (like your arms/hands)?

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Why do violent sneezes cause you to feel pain in seemingly unrelated body parts (like your arms/hands)?

In: Biology

I’d also like to know why the volume and power of sneezes increases as I grow older.

I can no longer silently sneeze like I used to

Sneezing can cause a peak in blood pressure, so places that have lots of larger vessels (neck, chest, arms, legs) can hurt.

A sneeze often involves a rapid and severe spasm of the entire chest. Aside from the direct effects this can cause a sudden change in your heart rate and blood pressure. A sudden spike or trough in blood pressure is probably causing any sensation you feel in your extremities.

You used the word violent, and that word is correct at least to body parts we don’t seem to notice regularly.

Sometimes a sneeze is felt for a moment, and you are ready for it.

Sometimes a sneeze happens and your entire body reacts. Many of your core muscles react. They tense up, they spasm. Often even if you are expecting a sneeze, a sneeze can cause a chain of events.

Your back muscles, especially lower back muscles will tighten. People don’t always hunch over because of manners. Some people with lower back problems figure out their back problems because of a sneeze. The muscles tense up and BAM, revealed. Probably better than falling on some ice though. Your back has a thing with dealing a ton of your nerves.

If your arms feel funny from a sneeze, a chiropractor should be able to help you with it.

I don’t think you’re supposed to feel pain, unless that bodypart is already injured. The only time I ever felt pain sneezing, was when I hurt my back in an incident that has nothing to do with sneezing.

Just to clarify, are you holding in your sneezes? Because that is not healthy. It puts excessive pressure on your lungs.