Why does Earth have a supercontinent cycle?

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Every 200 million years or so, a supercontinent is formed composed of all of the continents of the world. About 255 million years ago, it was called Pangaea. It looked really cool, it had enormous inland lakes and every continent was mashed together. There were only 3 oceans from the looks of it at that time.

In around 200 million years or so, we are due to have another supercontinent form. It’s called Pangaea Ultima. Of course, it won’t happen at once, it’s happening gradually, and going on right now.

But, why? Why does the Earth consistently move continents together in 200 million years, and then moves them away? Is there any geological benefit to this and why do the tectonic plates move specifically towards the prime meridian and equator of the Earth as opposed to the extremes on the sides?

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The tectonic plates are basically constantly moving. Whatever is on them will move with them, so eventually, all the land that is present will have moved, with the plates, to where the plates are meeting.

>why do the tectonic plates move specifically towards the prime meridian and equator of the Earth as opposed to the extremes on the sides?

The Earth is round. If they were moving to the “sides”, they’d just be meeting at what we call International Date Line (180E or 180W) or at the North/South poles. They’re never going to completely drift away from each other, because they’ll eventually come back around the other side and meet again.

If humans miraculously make it that long, it would be interesting how relationships, cultures, and interaction between countries change or evolve (especially having the Americas smooshed with asia and europe).