Why does pee come out in 2 streams?

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It makes a sort of helix and it’s weird.

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11 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Human bodies aren’t mathematically perfect. Pee holes aren’t perfect circles.

I don’t think there are scientific studies with large population counts of pee holes, but if you check your pee hole it’s likely slightly larger in the top and bottom with a pinch in the center.

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

What?

You should probably get that looked at mate. That sounds like you might have a problem, and that’s not an area you wanna ignore.

Could be benign. Might be old ejaculate in the pipes. Could be a UTI. Might just be the shape of your urethra. Could be indicative of cancer or a prostate issue.
Lots of reasons for this. Half of them are somewhat concerning.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It doesnt come out in two separate streams for most people (most if the time). But you do get that helical effect. I’ve read that it keeps the liquid in a single coherent stream rather than spraying in all directions.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because you don’t pee out of a circular hole. You pee out of a slit (yes, you, too). That slit has a top and a bottom. Sometimes, it’s been quite a while since you’ve peed, and if you ever pressed your lips together for a long time and felt that peeling sensation when you open them again, just understand that’s not something that only happens to lips. So, now you have a too stream and a bottom stream for a few moments. But, even after that, the rate of flow is *ever so slightly* different between the top and the bottom of the stream. It’s still bound by surface tension, so it has to pass through… itself, really… and that creates the helical effect.

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

whos pee comes out in 2 streams? i thought it just comes as one. never seen this ‘helix’ you refer to.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Funnily enough, Steve Mould has a (https://youtu.be/eOuai2p3qgw) on this exact topic. But here’s a short summary.

Water has surface tension. It tries to minimise the amount of surface area. For a column of water falling, that would be a cylinder. Imagine a thin slice of that column: it would be a circle. But we pee out of a slot shape. This means that that slice starts as an oval stretched front/back. Then, as it falls, surface tension causes it to pull in at the front/back and push out at the sides. It briefly forms a circle, but then momentum causes it to continue in those directions, instead forming an oval that’s stretched at the sides. Then, it pings back the other way and the cycle repeats as it falls. And the same happens for every other thin slice of that column.

All this together causes the whole stream to look a bit like a length of chain (not so much like a helix if you have a good look).