There are no colors that can mix into primary colors, but how can a color form if it’s not mixed with other colors?

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I don’t get it.

In: 3

All primary colors can be mixed with one another the product is secondary colors, not sure what your asking here?

Wait, I think I get what you’re asking. You’re asking why you can’t mix colors to make, say yellow? You want to know what makes a primary color a primary color as opposed to a secondary color?

Only one part of your question makes sense: “How does color form?”

Color is how humans perceive different light spectra. Your eyes plus brain see color images via three types of light receptor cells in your eyes, called cones. Each type of cone is sensitive to light in different ways, with different sensitivity to each frequency of light. It’s the amount of excitation of the three types of cones that make the color.

Primary colors are merely colors selected such that different mixtures of them can produce a sufficiently large range of colors. But the premise of your question is wrong. Primary colors *can* be created by the mixture of different colors. Moreover, the selection of primary colors is somewhat arbitrary. It needn’t be red, green, and blue (for light), or cyan, magenta, and yellow (for pigments and dyes).

Colors are based on Light; The base color that all light adds up to is White, so what we see is White – (color you see)

So colors are different frequencies of visible light reflected off of a surface. The color you see is a combination of the visible light that the surface it is reflected off of didn’t absorb. From there, understand that [what your language uses to describe color changes how you perceive it](https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00551/full) as well- if your language doesn’t have a word to describe pink, then you would have difficulty differentiating pink from light shades of red for example.

When you see a green leaf, that leaf isn’t mixing yellow and blue, it’s just green. Just as red, yellow, and blue exist on their own, so too do colors that you can create by mixing those three. The secondary colors can’t be mixed to make a primary color simply because the secondary colors are derivatives of the primary colors. That said, you can’t actually make every possible color out of just red, yellow, and blue and those aren’t even universal primary colors. Printers will use cyan, magenta, yellow, and black while television screens use red, green, and blue for example.

Are you asking what makes a primary color a primary color? Primary colors are selected such that when you mix them in different ways, you get a sufficiently large range of other colors. But there’s no rule about how to select primary colors. Many different sets of primary colors are possible. The primary colors we choose have a lot to do with engineering realities, like the costs of different pigments, dyes, and light-emitting devices.

Also, primary colors *can* be created by the mixture of different colors.

First, I think we should explore the difference between color, as it exists in the visible spectrum of light and color in pigment mixing, that you would use to create paint colors.

When you put white light through a prism you get bands of colors. We usually say these are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Our eyes and brains interpret these as colors.

When mixing pigments, combinations of red, yellow and blue can create many other colors, including secondary colors on the color wheel. This is sort of a simplification of color mixing though, because cyan, magenta and yellow pigments actually can produce more hues when mixed. That is why printers use these pigments to create all others hues. We produce pigments from different things like plants, chemicals, etc. There are a variety of hues of pigment that can correspond to a color in the light spectrum.

Color pigments and the colors in the light spectrum are related because the color pigments absorb certain bands of light and reflect other ones. When we mix pigments together we change how light is absorbed and reflected, which changes how our eyes perceive that color.

The cyan, magenta and yellow colours used to produce inks, paints and dyes are created using chemicals which can be created with chemical synthesis techniques, sometimes using organic ingredients. See [this video](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1m3YKla8-o) to see the kind of things that are possible. You can see that chemical reactions can result in colour changes that don’t follow the rules of colour mixing.

As for what’s actually used for things like ink-jet printer ink, see [this patent](https://patents.google.com/patent/US4818285) which lists some chemical ingredients.

So when you mix red and yellow watercolors, you get orange. But in orange color, there is no orange pigment, only a mixture of red and yellow pigments.

So, in order to make the orange color into a red color again, *you would need to take the yellow pigment out*, rather than mixing it with something else.

0 views

I don’t get it.

In: 3

All primary colors can be mixed with one another the product is secondary colors, not sure what your asking here?

Wait, I think I get what you’re asking. You’re asking why you can’t mix colors to make, say yellow? You want to know what makes a primary color a primary color as opposed to a secondary color?

Only one part of your question makes sense: “How does color form?”

Color is how humans perceive different light spectra. Your eyes plus brain see color images via three types of light receptor cells in your eyes, called cones. Each type of cone is sensitive to light in different ways, with different sensitivity to each frequency of light. It’s the amount of excitation of the three types of cones that make the color.

Primary colors are merely colors selected such that different mixtures of them can produce a sufficiently large range of colors. But the premise of your question is wrong. Primary colors *can* be created by the mixture of different colors. Moreover, the selection of primary colors is somewhat arbitrary. It needn’t be red, green, and blue (for light), or cyan, magenta, and yellow (for pigments and dyes).

Colors are based on Light; The base color that all light adds up to is White, so what we see is White – (color you see)

So colors are different frequencies of visible light reflected off of a surface. The color you see is a combination of the visible light that the surface it is reflected off of didn’t absorb. From there, understand that [what your language uses to describe color changes how you perceive it](https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00551/full) as well- if your language doesn’t have a word to describe pink, then you would have difficulty differentiating pink from light shades of red for example.

When you see a green leaf, that leaf isn’t mixing yellow and blue, it’s just green. Just as red, yellow, and blue exist on their own, so too do colors that you can create by mixing those three. The secondary colors can’t be mixed to make a primary color simply because the secondary colors are derivatives of the primary colors. That said, you can’t actually make every possible color out of just red, yellow, and blue and those aren’t even universal primary colors. Printers will use cyan, magenta, yellow, and black while television screens use red, green, and blue for example.

Are you asking what makes a primary color a primary color? Primary colors are selected such that when you mix them in different ways, you get a sufficiently large range of other colors. But there’s no rule about how to select primary colors. Many different sets of primary colors are possible. The primary colors we choose have a lot to do with engineering realities, like the costs of different pigments, dyes, and light-emitting devices.

Also, primary colors *can* be created by the mixture of different colors.

First, I think we should explore the difference between color, as it exists in the visible spectrum of light and color in pigment mixing, that you would use to create paint colors.

When you put white light through a prism you get bands of colors. We usually say these are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Our eyes and brains interpret these as colors.

When mixing pigments, combinations of red, yellow and blue can create many other colors, including secondary colors on the color wheel. This is sort of a simplification of color mixing though, because cyan, magenta and yellow pigments actually can produce more hues when mixed. That is why printers use these pigments to create all others hues. We produce pigments from different things like plants, chemicals, etc. There are a variety of hues of pigment that can correspond to a color in the light spectrum.

Color pigments and the colors in the light spectrum are related because the color pigments absorb certain bands of light and reflect other ones. When we mix pigments together we change how light is absorbed and reflected, which changes how our eyes perceive that color.

The cyan, magenta and yellow colours used to produce inks, paints and dyes are created using chemicals which can be created with chemical synthesis techniques, sometimes using organic ingredients. See [this video](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1m3YKla8-o) to see the kind of things that are possible. You can see that chemical reactions can result in colour changes that don’t follow the rules of colour mixing.

As for what’s actually used for things like ink-jet printer ink, see [this patent](https://patents.google.com/patent/US4818285) which lists some chemical ingredients.

So when you mix red and yellow watercolors, you get orange. But in orange color, there is no orange pigment, only a mixture of red and yellow pigments.

So, in order to make the orange color into a red color again, *you would need to take the yellow pigment out*, rather than mixing it with something else.