Why do people with dementia forget things like people/events, but not things like the alphabet or relatively simple grammar? Or do they, and it’s just not really shown in western media?

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Why do people with dementia forget things like people/events, but not things like the alphabet or relatively simple grammar? Or do they, and it’s just not really shown in western media?

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The longer the memory stays, the harder it is to erase. Dementia damages more recent memories first. So a person you met 30 years ago will be forgotten before the alphabet you learned 80 years ago. And if dementia progresses so much that you forget the alphabet… well, you’d be a vegetable at this point.

They absolutely do. My grandmother suffered with Lewey Body Dementia for around 5-6 years before she died. At first she just became a bit scatty and have slightly incoherent trains of thought which we all just blamed on old age. The first sign that something was really wrong was when she started struggling to put basic sentences together in English and she would start switching more and more back to her mother tongue of Hindi. Eventually she stopped making sense in Hindi too. But in quite late stages of her dementia she would start trying to recite poetry.

Dementia can also affect you not just mentally but physically, parts of your body just simply stops responding to your brain.

They definitely do. That’s just how it starts. By the end, they forget how to eat, how to get dressed, how to go to the toilet.

There’s no set path of how dementia will affect an individual, people suffer in many different ways.

Its mainly the intellectual part of the brain that goes first, but when dad was in the nursing home other patients ranged from almost catatonic to others you might mistake for visitors rather than patients.

Some were placid, some angry, some wouldn’t eat, some were frantic.
Some didn’t change for years, some were gone in 6 months.

Dad didn’t know who we were for years, but one day I walked in and he said to the others ‘Ah, my boy is here, he’ll sort it out…’

For some it seemed worse for the family than the patients. but some were terrified and lived their last days in fear.

Awful disease, but there are no hard and fast rules.

They do. Look up late/end stage dementia. They can be completely nonverbal and completely dependent for care