Why do text articles that are written on popular news, hobby, and aggregate sites have typos, errors, etc.? I thought they wouldn’t want to pay any real “editors,” but why not just use Grammarly or spellcheck what they write in a word article?

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Why do text articles that are written on popular news, hobby, and aggregate sites have typos, errors, etc.? I thought they wouldn’t want to pay any real “editors,” but why not just use Grammarly or spellcheck what they write in a word article?

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A lot of the writers are underpaid and overworked, writing things they don’t care about or might even hate. It gets overlooked because it’s still bringing in revenue, and they’re still putting out as much content as they can for cheap. They basically don’t care.

Much of the article scraping is done automatically and there is no user review process.

Some of those sites have a staff of less than a dozen people.

The primary purpose of the site is to get clicks and show ads, the quality of the articles apparently is not important enough to justify the expense or they would.

Also if the scraping is a redirecting article bring displayed in their site, they can not edit the original.

I use Grammarly all the time, I even have a premium account. Yeah, 98% of what Grammarly catches I would catch myself in a careful proofread, but its automatic highlighting is what saves me tons of time.

Having said that, Grammarly can’t be/is not used sometimes because:

– it’s potentially sending what you write to their servers. Depending on the sensitivity of what you do, who you work for that may be a no-no

– while the browser add-in works great on sites like Reddit, it may not play nicely with heavily scripted web apps like a lot of content management and publishing services are… a lot of whom already have their own grammar and spellchecking.

– sometimes you don’t care.

– nowadays a lot of social media “reporting” is done from a mobile device – those articles are being submitted from a phone or a tablet. So if Grammarly doesn’t support those devices yet (they just announced iPad support) or the browser plugin doesn’t work on mobile browsers or it doesn’t play nicely with the app that does the content management… I can see why its not used.

Poorly edumacated. I remember my college English professor spending a whole half hour making sure we knew the difference between it’s (contraction) and its (possessive).

Some people just aren’t detail-oriented. Some people prioritize speed over accuracy. Some people are paid to do things quickly, not with perfection. Some bosses don’t check their employees’ work to ensure it’s at a specific standard. Like every other line of work, people who are extremely good at it are actually hard to find.

Because they found out the readers don’t care about that at all – there is zero revenue or traffic loss due to those occasional typos therefore a single dollar spent preventing them is just wasted money.

I’m not happy about it, but it’s true.