Why does previously broken bones hurt when there’s a change in the weather?

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I’ve experienced it and heard from other people too that before rain or extreme change in weather the bone just starts to ache for no reason. What’s the explanation?

In: Biology

10 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

When a bone heals after being broken, it can leave small spaces inside that might have air bubbles or fluid. When the weather changes, especially with shifts in air pressure, these bubbles or fluids can move slightly. This movement can press on the nerves near the old break, causing mild aches or pain. It’s similar to how your ears might “pop” when you go up a mountain or fly in an airplane due to changes in air pressure. For people with healed broken bones, these changes can sometimes be felt as pain.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Changes in air pressure.

You know how you always here people saying “there’s a storm coming” because they can “feel it in my _____ [body part that’s usually had surgery].”

Changes in weather are generally precipitated by a change in air pressure. Warm / cold fronts travel along the leading edge of a high/low pressure system.

That pressure gets felt in the body. Usually through a change in pressure in minuscule amounts of fluids in old surgical sites.

Anonymous 0 Comments

They don’t necessarily do. I broke both my arms and legs in a car accident. They sometimes hurt, but there’s no correlation to the weather for me.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Just to add to this. They don’t all get this.

Snapped my leg as a kid, don’t get any sort of pain in it.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Short answer: we don’t know.

The belief that weather effects alter pain is backed by a large 2019 review of 10,584 people in the UK in the scientific journal Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41746-019-0180-3

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s usually for those that have metal implants. It’s due to the reason many listed- pressure changes associated with the weather. It’s very pronounced due to the density variation already present from the bone to metal contact.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The earth has magnetic field that intensifies when high pressure weather systems cause electrostatic conditions that cause tiny vibrations in our bodies 

Anonymous 0 Comments

I can usually smell it before i think about the pain, but as I have arthritis in my hands and back, I’ve def noticed the big storms making things ache more.

Anonymous 0 Comments

You got some bone-bubble-barometer-activated-neuropatic-pain. Works for damaged joints too. Arthrosis is a birch.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I’ve had a lot of broken bones and I’ve also had internal metal fixation. A lot of both.

I can’t predict the weather or if I’m just extra achy for some reason. We just had a huge rainstorm but I’ve been achy AF for days so I don’t know if it’s because of that, other reasons, or a combo.