How is glass always so stable for seemingly all various chemical reactions?

589 views
0

I’ve been watching a lot of various YouTubers on chemistry for a while, and no matter what, glass is always the medium used wether it’s to hold extremely acidic or base (basic?) solutions, as well as mixing various chemicals to cause a reaction. Glass is just so inert that it doesn’t affect/ isn’t affected by chemicals? [This](https://www.reddit.com/r/blackmagicfuckery/comments/c219vb/super_acid_liquid/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app) is what really trigged my questions.

In: Chemistry

1: https://www.reddit.com/r/explainlikeimfive/comments/1il7lh/eli5_how_is_glass_chemically_inert/

2: https://www.reddit.com/r/explainlikeimfive/comments/a83pdt/eli5_why_is_glass_the_most_used_material_for/

3: https://www.reddit.com/r/explainlikeimfive/comments/1u7ynh/why_is_glass_the_most_chemically_stable_thing_ever/

4: https://www.reddit.com/r/explainlikeimfive/comments/28a8hj/eli5_what_makes_glass_so_chemically_stable/

You should search before posting. Anyways from 1:

>Glass aka silica aka silicon dioxide is very stable. The reason why glass seems inert is because most common elements and molecules in nature don’t have the attraction needed to take electrons from the silica and disrupt the electron bonds between the silicon and the oxygen

Edits: added more links