If DNA is deoxyribonucleic ACID, how much dissolving power does it have?

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If DNA is deoxyribonucleic ACID, how much dissolving power does it have?

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Extremely little. Technically it’s made up of both acidic and basic components but neither are considered especially “powerful” in their properties. Even though the molecules have acidic and basic components, we consider the “acidic” portion more important to the overall function of the molecule so we named it after that portion. But for obvious reasons (like, we don’t want to be Xenomorphs dissolving our own living flesh), overall, DNA is a relatively weak organic acid.

It’s considered a weak acid. And by acid we mean it disassociates ever so slightly into hydrogen ions (protons) and its base (everything else) in aqueous solution. Because you don’t want DNA to be very reactive with just anything, this is as far as its acidity goes. It seems to be just enough. If it was capable of protonating all sorts of s##t like, say, fluoroantimonic acid, it would be very unstable and unsuitable for genetic storage. But biochemistry happens in solution, and pretty much everything is an acid/base at that point.

Just because it uses the word acid does not mean it dissolves stuff, citrus fruits have citric acid in them, that doesn’t mean if a lemon lands on your roof it will go straight through it.