Why does a less powerful punch to the chin cause a knockout more often than a more powerful one to the middle of the face?

109 views
0

Why does a less powerful punch to the chin cause a knockout more often than a more powerful one to the middle of the face?

In: 14

That’s me right there. Glass chin. Punch e hard straight to the face = nothing. A breeze blows around my chin = knockout.

Waiting for answers too. Lol

I’ve heard 2 things. There’s a major nerve called the TMJ that can vulnerable in a hit to the jaw. When hit in your jaw your head rotates causing a lot more brain trauma as it impacts the skull trying to catch back up ( it floats in fluid so it lags behind). That rotation can be worse than just a side to side impact.

If you think about the head having a vertical pivot point (the point around which it turns as you turn your head side to side), the jaw is the furthest point from that. Torque = force x distance, meaning force applied further away from a pivot is multiplied by the distance.

Basically, it causes a greater movement of the head and therefore the brain which causes the damage which leads to a knockout.

Also, there are more muscles protecting the head from moving in the back and forward plane than there are protecting from torsional movement.

Whiplash from the sudden twisting of your head. If you get hit directly in the center of your face, your skull will take the impact without causing as much sloshing of your brain. If you get hit in the chin, your whole head will twist, slamming your brain into the side of your skull, knocking you out

The sweet spot to knock someone out is on the jaw line, where the jaw bone attaches to the temple.

It spins your head very fast and you get knocked tf out.