where is all of the water going?

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As it seems like the entire world is currently suffering with drought conditions, what happens to all of the water? I would think if one area is suffering a drought others would have heavy rain but that doesn’t seem to be happening.

In: 6

Two different things to consider here:

1) Due to a more energized climate, storms are stronger and heavier. This exacerbates drought conditions as heavy rain storms are over quicker and tend to wash away dirt rather than soak into the ground.

2) Places that are already wetter, SE Asia, the Subcontinent, and others, are getting heavier rain than before.

So, places that are already dry are getting drier and storms are stronger, which ironically, makes droughts worse.

Some areas have more rain, also warmer air can carry more water which means humidity in the air can be higher. This deasn’t help vegetation that only gets water from the ground.

It is totally happening. The news about a drought in the Southwest US is on the same weather page as flooding in Appalachia. Water is a very, very stable molecule, it takes a lot of energy to separate those hydrogen atoms. The worldwide mass of water is approximately constant.

Have a look at a weather radar map. There’s plenty of rain about

https://www.accuweather.com/en/gb/national/weather-radar

There’s a set amount of water on land, in oceans, and in the air (as water vapor and as clouds).

The amounts at each are continually changing in the natural water cycle.

Climate change warmth is causing more moisture to evaporate faster and that’s water that could’ve fed the water table and the connected streams that feed rivers and lakes.

The extra ~~moisturizer~~ moisture in the air amplifies the trapping of heat (the emitted infrared light by stuff on ground cannot pass through water nor co2, so its energy is delayed from leaving the Earth while the heat of sunlight is adding more, therefore the extra buildup of heat is evaporating the water on Earth’s surface faster.